New Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) to advise FAA on avgas transition

February 4, 2011 at 2:48 pm | Posted in Aviation Law Current Event | Leave a comment

by Sara M. Langston with the blog faculty

Source: AOPA

FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt has signed a charter establishing an aviation rulemaking committee (ARC) to advise the agency on the move toward an unleaded fuel.

The ARC will be a joint government/industry committee tasked with identifying key issues relating to, and providing recommendations for, the development and deployment of an unleaded avgas. The move comes in response to a request by the General Aviation (GA) Avgas Coalition, which includes AOPA, the American Petroleum Institute (API), the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA), the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), the National Air Transportation Association (NATA), the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), and the National Petrochemical and Refiners Association (NPRA).

“Essentially, while the EPA can regulate what comes out of the tail pipe, the FAA has to regulate what goes in the fill pipe.” Rob Hackman, AOPA vice-president of regulatory affairs.

Unlike other ARCs which suggest regulatory language to the FAA as it considers new rules, the Avgas Transition ARC will help the FAA and industry design the process by which potential solutions will be approved for use in aircraft and identify tasks necessary to support a transition to an unleaded avgas. The ARC will be working on a tight timeline. The charter is valid for six months, with an option for the FAA sponsor, the manager of the Engine and Propeller Directorate, to extend the charter for an additional six months.

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