IAC: Session E.3.1 – Developments in National Space Policies and Programs

September 29, 2008 at 7:16 pm | Posted in Space Law | 1 Comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

This is part of a series of posts done from the 59th Astronautical Congress and the 51st Colloquium on the Law of Outer Space. The wrap-up has links to all the posts.

Session E.3.1: Developments in National Space Policies and Programs:

John Logsdon:
-Logsdon presented on the challenges facing the next president of the United States. His paper was withdrawn due to his involvement with the Obama campaign. His statements however do not represent the Obama campaign’s)
– He stated that the next resident will have to decide whether or not to adopt the Vision for Space Exploration which he referred to as a proposal.
– He stated that three major decisions will be whether the chosen technical infrastructure for the U.S. space program is right; whether the policy of retiring the space shuttle is correct; and what budget level should NASA be funded at.
– He said that more has been said about space in this campaign than in previous ones, but stated that it was nclear as to whether this was due to an importance in space or an importance in Florida as a voting state.
– He stated that both candidates favor exploring the Moon and Mars. He stated that Obama supports international cooperation in this, but that the McCain campaign has not yet used the word “international.”
– Both Campaigns support continuation of support for the IIS, according to Logsdon.
-Both campaigns support stimulating commerce and education

Mustapha Masmoudi:
– Masmoudi presented on Tunisian space policy
– Tunisian space policy supports the peaceful uses of outer space
– Tunisia has been active in UN meetings on space
-Objectives for the National Space Committee of Tunisia include: Protecting economic, social, cultural, and strategic interests in space matters; promoting technological and science cooperation; protection of natural resources; strengthening industry; communications technology; and an interest in space tourism
– Tunisia also has an interest in education
– Masmoudi also stated that satellite technology could be crucial in reducing disparities between developed and developing countries

Maki Yoshihara:
– Of JAXA presented on space activity in Asia- Pacific region
– The key players in space activities in the Asia-Pacific region are Japan, China, India, Korea
– Other actors are Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam
– There is multilateral cooperation in the region: APSCC, APSCO, and APRSAF
– Yoshihara then highlighted the acomplishments of APRSAF

Charlotte Mathieu:
– Presented on Russia space cooperation with China and India
– She stated that Russia has emerged with a stronger economy based on its defense and energy sectors, a political stability, and a new more assertive and confident international posture.
– Russian space is a strategic sector both politically and economically and had increased in space programs budget
– Russia and China relations were restored in 1989. There is current cooperation in the defense and energy sectors. Space cooperation resumed in the 1990s and there is a Joint Commission on space Cooperation that came into being in 2000. Main fields of cooperation are spaceflight, science, and exploration.
Russia and India have had relations since 1962 and also cooperate in the defense and energy sectors. They have a low level of trade but the cooperation goes further that the cooperation of Russia with China. Space cooperation has existed since the 1970s and focuses on launchers, navigation, and science.
– Russia and Europe are independent partners with strong cooperation. However, Russia has cooperation alternatives with India and China. Because of this Europe faces challenges in its cooperation with Russia.

K.R. Sridhara Murthi:
– presented exstensively on India’s space program.
-Two guiding principles for ISRO: 1) to be second to none in space technology and 2) to be self reliant.
– Three major dimensions of ISRO’s strategy: Organizational, Focus, and Human Resources
– New focuses for the next five years: Communications, Navigation, Earth Observation, Space Sciences

Janusz B. Zielinski:
-Ukraine was the cradle of Soviet Launch capacity, thus infrastructure for space capabilities is already there.
– Poland lacked the same infrastructure, yet after 1989 began to align itself with European space programs
-Cooperation between Poland and the Ukraine Began in 1994 with a formal agreement. Cooperation covers areas such as navigation, satellite tracking, ionosphere investigation, and exchange of staff and students among other areas.

Marius-loan Piso:
– Of the Romanian Space Agency (ROSA) which was established in 1991.
– ROSA serves as a national representative of International organizations such as ESA and UNCOPUOS.
-ROSA space applications focus on space security and disaster management.
– ROSA has a major focus on space security research
– He stated tah Romania will probably apply for membership in ESA in the next year.

Library: A Round-up of Reading

September 29, 2008 at 6:20 pm | Posted in Library | Leave a comment

Articles
Ewalt, Shelley A. Et resurrexit: GARA and the trio of cases on collateral review. 46 Duq. L. Rev. 177-210 (2008)

Kerry V. Kovarik, A Good Idea Stretched Too Far: Amending the General Aviation Revitalization Act to Mitigate Unintended Inequities, 31 Seattle University Law Review 973 (2008).

Journals
ICAO Journal, V. 63, n. 5

Reports
IISL Standing Committee on the Status of International Agreements Relating to Activities in Outer Space 2008 Annual Report

NASA Advisory Council Council Recommendation – July 10, 2008

CRS – The Manhattan Project, the Apollo Program, and Federal Energy Technology R&D Programs: A Comparative Analysis

Aviation Safety: FAA Has Increased Efforts to Address Runway Incursions. GAO-08-1169T, September 25

Space Acquisitions: Uncertainties in the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle Program Pose Management and Oversight Challenges. GAO-08-1039, September 26

Aviation Safety: FAA Has Taken Steps to Determine That It Has Made Correct Medical Certification Decisions. GAO-08-997, September 17

Blogs
START: Dead Treaty Walking – Arms Control Wonk

Senator Obama endorses INKSNA waiver extension – Space Politics

Soyuz Waiver Update – NASA Watch

Senate committee passes INKSNA waiver bill; is a compromise possible? – Space Politics

Hurricane satellite legislation – Space Politics

In Interview with the USDOT GIO – NSGIC Blog

Russia And China: A Future Alliance In The Making? – Colony Worlds

Sneaking an INKSNA extension into a CR – Space Politics

Air & Space Law: global concern, global perspective needed for new rules – McGill Reporter

A little stimulus for NASA – Space Politics

Spatial Data Infrastructure, Coordination, and Access Policy Research – GeoData Policy

Feeney’s gapfiller – Space Politics

NASA Authorization Sent to President – Spaceports

Failed bail-out bad news for aviation – Leeham News and Comment

International Space: Space Race or Federation – JSC Advanced Planning Office Blog

Testimony
Statement of Henry Krakowski, Chief Operating Officer, Air Traffic Organization, Before the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Aviation on Runway Safety: An Update

Letters
IFPTE Letter to Sen. Mikulski and Rep. Mollohan Regarding NASA Appropriations

Senate Passes INKSNA Waiver

September 29, 2008 at 6:14 pm | Posted in Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J Blount with the blog faculty

On September 26, 2008 the Senate passed HR 2638, an appropriations bill that includes a waiver to the Iran, North Korea, Syria Nonproliferation Act that allows NASA o buy access to the ISS from Russia. The bill now needs a Presidential signature.

IAC: Plenary Session 2 – Heads of Space Agencies

September 29, 2008 at 5:20 pm | Posted in Space Law | Comments Off on IAC: Plenary Session 2 – Heads of Space Agencies

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

This is part of a series of posts done from the 59th Astronautical Congress and the 51st Colloquium on the Law of Outer Space. The wrap-up has links to all the posts.

Plenary Session 1 consisted of remarks from the heads and representatives of numerous space agencies:

Michael Griffin, NASA:
– NASA and partners are finishing the International Space Station
-Is the United States going to end its commitment in 2015? “I can not imagine that happening” Griffin stated that while he won’t be the administrator, he doesn’t think that the United States will cease to support the ISS.
– NASA’s space plan can’t stop at the ISS. NASA next moves will be towards the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and Mars. U.S. policy is to do this with international partners
-Ares and Orion are moving along “quite well”
-NASA on a path to shuttle retirement. Griffin stated that Congress has passed INKSNA waiver
-The NASA Authorization Act passed this week by a Democratic congress is similar to the 2005 one by Republican congress, so Griffin stated that there is bipartisan support for the U.S. space program.

Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA:
-ESA is now an ISS partner in space with the launch of Columbus space laboratory
-ESA also launched the Jules Verne ATV to the ISS this past year.
-EC has passed full funding of GALILEO, so ESA will be pursuing that program.
-EC Council mission coming up, and ESA has put forth with numerous proposals.
-Dordain also mentioned upcoming ESA missions

Alexander Medvedchikov, Roscosmos:
-Federal Space Program and GLONASS are separate programs
-Russia is giving more attention on space sciences
-Major investment is being made into the human space flight programs. Including the upcoming ISS mission.
-Russia still launches more space missions than other States
– There was a recent decision to increase GLONASS funding. On September 25, 3 satellites were launched into the contellation and 3 more will be launched by the end of the year. These will provide for full Russian coverage and near 100% global coverage. Six new satellites will be launched next year, which will make for a full constellation next year.
-International cooperation is crucial and Medvedchikov said he was glad to hear of NASA’s commitment to the ISS
– Russia has stable and increasing funding for the space program
-Russia is strongly committed to international programs in space such as the ISS, Soyuz and Vienna Space Center, and new generation space transportation systems

B.N. Suresh, ISRO:
– Suresh highlighted the progress in India’s space programs
– The PSLV C9 – launched 10 satellites into orbit at once; numerous international satellites among those launched
-India will launch Chandryan 1 a lunar mission. It is to be launched at the end of October, and will have international instruments on board
-ISRO known for using space for the “benefit of mankind” including: Earth Observation; Tele-Medicine; Tele-education; village resources centers; and space based disaster management network
– Future programs: Broadcast satellites, Pacific-Asia disaster management, and space education

Keiji Tachikawa, JAXA;
– In the past year JAXA launched a Moon mission
– The Japanese experiment module for the ISS was also launched and has begun its experiments
– Tachikawa thanked JAXA’s international partners
– JAXA’s focus is now on shifting from R & D to utilization of technology for society. This includes disaster monitoring satellites.
– The future holds a year of change for JAXA. Space development has been given priority by the Government of Japan

Sun Laiyan, CSNA:
– Laiyan thanked participants for support of Shenzou-7 mission which conducted its first successful EVA
– last October China launched a lunar exploration mission, which created a complete image of the Moon’s surface
– China launched a CBERS satellite with its Brazillian partners
– China also launched two disaster mitigation and monitoring satellites in septamber, this will become a constellation of 8 satellites
– China also agreed with Russia to participate in Mars exploration missions
– Future plans: new generation launch vehicle by 2013; continued human mission with docking missions; a space lab by 2011; robotic Moon landing by 2013; and a high resolution Indian system

Steve MacLean, CSA:
– Maclaen noted that 46 years ago on this day Canada became a spacefaring nation
– He then highlighted Canada’s commitment to International Cooperation
– He stated that Canad

Federal Register: Announcement of National Geospatial Advisory Committee Meeting

September 29, 2008 at 5:03 pm | Posted in Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

The Department of the Interiror published an Announcement of National Geospatial Advisory Committee Meeting in today’s Federal Register (73 F.R. 56608):

SUMMARY: The National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC) will meet on October 15-16, 2008 at the National Conservation Training Center, 698 Conservation Way, Shepherdstown, WV 25443. The meeting will be held in Room 161 Instructional West.

The NGAC, which is composed of representatives from governmental, private sector, non-profit, and academic organizations, has been established to advise the Chair of the Federal Geographic Data Committee on management of Federal geospatial programs, the development of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure, and the implementation of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-16. Topics to be addressed at the meeting include:

–Changing Landscape White Paper.
–Geospatial Transition Paper.
–National Land Parcel Data Study.
–Imagery for the Nation Update.
–Geospatial Line of Business Update.
–NGAC Action Plan.

The meeting will include two opportunities for public comment. During the afternoon of October 15, comments specific to National Land Parcel Data may be offered. In addition, there will be a general public comment period during the morning of October 16. Comments may also be submitted to the NGAC in writing.

59th International Astronautical Congress

September 29, 2008 at 7:24 am | Posted in Space Law Current Events | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

This is part of a series of posts done from the 59th Astronautical Congress and the 51st Colloquium on the Law of Outer Space. The wrap-up has links to all the posts.

The 59th Asronautical Congress opened this morning in Glasgow Scotland, and tomorrow 51st Colloquium on the Law of Outer Space will open at the Congress. Res Communis (internet connection willing) will be live blogging from the Congress and (especially) from the Colloquium. If the internet connection doesn’t work out (or the lap top battery dies) look out for end of the day wrap ups.

Senate Passes Resolutions of Ratification for the Amendments to the Constitution and Convention of International Telecommunication Union

September 28, 2008 at 9:17 am | Posted in Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

The Senate passed resolutions of ratification for the Amendments to the Constitution and Convention of International Telecommunication Union (hat tip International Law Reporter):

Congressinal Record, S9557 (September 25, 2008)

H.R. 7157: To require that radios used in the satellite digital radio service be capable of receiving terrestrial digital radio signals

September 27, 2008 at 4:58 pm | Posted in Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with thw blog faculty

H.R. 7157: To require that radios used in the satellite digital radio service be capable of receiving terrestrial digital radio signals was introduced on September 26, 2008 by Rep. Edward Markey (D-MA). The text is not yet available on Thomas.

H.R. 7156: To amend title 49, United States Code, to provide for the restoration of air service to communities served by an airport that received scheduled air transportation as of December 31, 2007, but no longer receives such service.

September 27, 2008 at 4:56 pm | Posted in Aviation Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

H.R. 7156: To amend title 49, United States Code, to provide for the restoration of air service to communities served by an airport that received scheduled air transportation as of December 31, 2007, but no longer receives such service was introduced on September 26, 2008 by Rep. Tim Mahoney (D-FL). The text is not yet available on Thomas.

S. 3630: A bill to authorize a comprehensive program of nationwide access to Federal remote sensing data, to promote use of the program for education, workforce training and development, and applied research, and to support Federal, State, tribal, and local government programs

September 27, 2008 at 4:51 pm | Posted in Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

S. 3630: A bill to authorize a comprehensive program of nationwide access to Federal remote sensing data, to promote use of the program for education, workforce training and development, and applied research, and to support Federal, State, tribal, and local government programs was introduced on September 26, 2008 by Sen. Tim Johnson (D-SD). The text is not yet available on Thomas.

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