The Future of Space Exploration and International Cooperation

April 29, 2010 at 12:11 pm | Posted in Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount and the blog faculty

From Space.com:

Future Space Exploration Hinges on International Cooperation, Astronauts Say
By Clara Moskowitz
Senior Writer
posted: 29 April 2010
07:52 am ET

The final frontier must become more of an international endeavor or space exploration could stagnate, according to three veteran astronauts from two different countries.

Only through further collaboration between nations can humanity reach its next major space goals, the spaceflying group — which included a former NASA astronaut, an American space tourist and the first Chinese man to fly into space — said at the 26th National Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colo., this month.

“I think the development of space endeavors is not for one nation or one country,” said Yang Liwei, China’s first astronaut. “I myself as an astronaut, I believe that the multinational, the international cooperation is the future triumph of the development of space industry,” he said through a translator. . . . [Full Story]

Saudi Arabia to Monitor Google Earth

April 29, 2010 at 12:03 pm | Posted in Remote Sensing Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

From Asharq Alawsat (hat tip Spatial Law and Policy Blog)::

Saudi Arabia: Government to Monitor Google Earth

15/04/2010

By Turki Al-Saheil

Riyadh, Asharq Al-Awsat- The Shura Council’s Committee for Transport, Communication and Information Technology has revealed that the Saudi Arabian government has formed a governmental team made up of 3 governmental agencies to monitor the maps offered by Google Earth and ensure that these do not include images of military sites or other sensitive areas.

This was revealed after national security become a subject of concern to a number of Shura Council deputies, and they expressed fears that satellite imaging of the earth could be used to transgress Saudi Arabia’s national security.

During the annual meeting to discuss the yearly Committee for Transport, Communication and Information Technology report, Shura Council deputy Abdul-Rahman al-Atawi called for “a special system to protect…privacy to be put in place.” He justified his demand for this system by saying that it is in order to ensure that intelligence agencies and terrorist groups do not utilize sensitive satellite imagery [in their operations]. . . . [Full Story]

New Tarmac Rule Gives Air Travelers Exit Privilege

April 29, 2010 at 3:09 am | Posted in Aviation Law | Leave a comment

by Joanne Irene Gabrynowicz with the blog faculty

Source: NPR

by LARRY ABRAMSON

It’s not covered by the Geneva Conventions, but being trapped in an airplane while waiting for takeoff sometimes feels like a crime against humanity.

Starting Thursday, airline passengers stuck on the tarmac have some redress. Under a new federal rule, passengers must have the chance to get off that motionless plane three hours after leaving the gate.

Many passengers have faced the scenario where they’re waiting for their flight to take off, and then weather or air traffic intervenes. A quick taxi to the runway becomes an ordeal.

At Baltimore-Washington International Airport recently, Syed Hussain was waiting for his bags. He said he was stuck for five hours at Houston’s Hobby Airport because of a thunderstorm. He said he and other passengers onboard waited and waited, and they weren’t offered any refreshments.

Now passengers like Hussain can complain to Ray LaHood. The transportation secretary has been a big defender of the new rule, which he says stipulates that “the pilot has to go back to the terminal when the three-hour period is up to let the people get off of the plane and do what they want to do.”

A Hefty Fine

If the airline misses that deadline, it will face a fine of fine of $27,500 per passenger, LaHood says. And passengers will no longer have to go hungry. They can look forward to snacks and “potable water” after two hours. And the lavatory also must be working.

The airlines declined NPR’s request for interviews. The companies said they were in “compliance mode,” meaning they have given up trying to fight the rule. Airlines had argued they have no control over the weather, and that the rule would be too costly.

The rule comes at a time when many airlines are struggling financially.

But LaHood says they need to deal with the new requirement: “I have no doubt they will figure out [a] way to schedule planes to account for the fact that there could be delays.”

LaHood is responding to a deluge of complaints about the problem. The tipping point came last summer, when a Continental flight spent six hours on the runway in Rochester, Minn., because no one would let passengers into the terminal.

Passenger Reactions

The Transportation Department should garner big points from consumers for taking this step, judging by sentiments at BWI Airport.

“The weather is obviously an uncontrollable force,” said Abbey Cole, who had just arrived at BWI from San Diego. “However, I have no sympathy with the airlines due to their mismanagement.”

Drew Hevle says it can get steamy sitting on the tarmac for long periods of time. He flew into Baltimore from Houston.

“I think three hours is probably too long to sit there, you know, usually with no air conditioning,” Hevle said. “And then they won’t give you any service while you’re sitting there. They won’t open the bar.”

Some airlines recently asked for waivers from the rule at certain airports, saying for example that construction at JFK is making it tough to follow a schedule. But LaHood told them to forget it.

“This rule does not apply to international flights,” LaHood says. “And most of the flights at Kennedy are international flights.”

There is a potential downside for passengers. When in doubt, airlines may decide to cancel flights to pre-empt possible fines. So, when bad weather strikes, passengers will be just as stuck, but they will be able to stretch their legs.

H.R. 5147: Airport and Airway Extension Act of 2010

April 28, 2010 at 3:34 pm | Posted in Aviation Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

H.R. 5147: Airport and Airway Extension Act of 2010 was introduced on April 27, 2010 by Rep. James Oberstar (D-MN8):

HR 5147 IH

111th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. R. 5147

To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to extend the funding and expenditure authority of the Airport and Airway Trust Fund, to amend title 49, United States Code, to extend authorizations for the airport improvement program, and for other purposes.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

April 27, 2010

Mr. OBERSTAR (for himself, Mr. MICA, Mr. LEVIN, Mr. CAMP, Mr. COSTELLO, and Mr. PETRI) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and in addition to the Committee on Ways and Means, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned

A BILL

To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to extend the funding and expenditure authority of the Airport and Airway Trust Fund, to amend title 49, United States Code, to extend authorizations for the airport improvement program, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the ‘Airport and Airway Extension Act of 2010’.

SEC. 2. EXTENSION OF TAXES FUNDING AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND.

(a) Fuel Taxes- Subparagraph (B) of section 4081(d)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by striking ‘April 30, 2010’ and inserting ‘July 3, 2010’.

(b) Ticket Taxes-

(1) PERSONS- Clause (ii) of section 4261(j)(1)(A) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by striking ‘April 30, 2010’ and inserting ‘July 3, 2010’.

(2) PROPERTY- Clause (ii) of section 4271(d)(1)(A) of such Code is amended by striking ‘April 30, 2010’ and inserting ‘July 3, 2010’.

(c) Effective Date- The amendments made by this section shall take effect on May 1, 2010.

SEC. 3. EXTENSION OF AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND EXPENDITURE AUTHORITY.

(a) In General- Paragraph (1) of section 9502(d) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended–

(1) by striking ‘May 1, 2010’ and inserting ‘July 4, 2010’; and

(2) by inserting ‘or the Airport and Airway Extension Act of 2010’ before the semicolon at the end of subparagraph (A).

(b) Conforming Amendment- Paragraph (2) of section 9502(e) of such Code is amended by striking ‘May 1, 2010’ and inserting ‘July 4, 2010’.

(c) Effective Date- The amendments made by this section shall take effect on May 1, 2010.

SEC. 4. EXTENSION OF AIRPORT IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM.

(a) Authorization of Appropriations-

(1) IN GENERAL- Section 48103(7) of title 49, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

‘(7) $3,024,657,534 for the period beginning on October 1, 2009, and ending on July 3, 2010.’.

(2) AVAILABILITY OF AMOUNTS- Sums made available pursuant to the amendment made by paragraph (1) shall remain available until expended.

(3) PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION- For purposes of calculating funding apportionments and meeting other requirements under sections 47114, 47115, 47116, and 47117 of title 49, United States Code, for the period beginning on October 1, 2009, and ending on July 3, 2010, the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration shall–

(A) first calculate funding apportionments on an annualized basis as if the total amount available under section 48103 of such title for fiscal year 2010 were $4,000,000,000; and

(B) then reduce by 17 percent–

(i) all funding apportionments calculated under subparagraph (A); and

(ii) amounts available pursuant to sections 47117(b) and 47117(f)(2) of such title.

(b) Project Grant Authority- Section 47104(c) of such title is amended by striking ‘April 30, 2010,’ and inserting ‘July 3, 2010,’.

SEC. 5. EXTENSION OF EXPIRING AUTHORITIES.

(a) Section 40117(l)(7) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ‘May 1, 2010.’ and inserting ‘July 4, 2010.’.

(b) Section 44302(f)(1) of such title is amended–

(1) by striking ‘April 30, 2010,’ and inserting ‘July 3, 2010,’; and

(2) by striking ‘July 31, 2010,’ and inserting ‘September 30, 2010,’.

(c) Section 44303(b) of such title is amended by striking ‘July 31, 2010,’ and inserting ‘September 30, 2010,’.

(d) Section 47107(s)(3) of such title is amended by striking ‘May 1, 2010.’ and inserting ‘July 4, 2010.’.

(e) Section 47115(j) of such title is amended by striking ‘May 1, 2010,’ and inserting ‘July 4, 2010,’.

(f) Section 47141(f) of such title is amended by striking ‘April 30, 2010.’ and inserting ‘July 3, 2010.’.

(g) Section 49108 of such title is amended by striking ‘April 30, 2010,’ and inserting ‘July 3, 2010,’.

(h) Section 161 of the Vision 100–Century of Aviation Reauthorization Act (49 U.S.C. 47109 note) is amended by striking ‘May 1, 2010,’ and inserting ‘July 4, 2010,’.

(i) Section 186(d) of such Act (117 Stat. 2518) is amended by striking ‘May 1, 2010,’ and inserting ‘July 4, 2010,’.

(j) The amendments made by this section shall take effect on May 1, 2010.

SEC. 6. FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION OPERATIONS.

Section 106(k)(1)(F) of title 49, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

‘(F) $7,070,158,159 for the period beginning on October 1, 2009, and ending on July 3, 2010.’.

SEC. 7. AIR NAVIGATION FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT.

Section 48101(a)(6) of title 49, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

‘(6) $2,220,252,132 for the period beginning on October 1, 2009, and ending on July 3, 2010.’.

SEC. 8. RESEARCH, ENGINEERING, AND DEVELOPMENT.

Section 48102(a)(14) of title 49, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

‘(14) $144,049,315 for the period beginning on October 1, 2009, and ending on July 3, 2010.’.

S. Con. Res. 61: A concurrent resolution expressing the sense of the Congress that general aviation pilots and industry should be recognized for the contributions made in response to Haiti earthquake relief efforts

April 28, 2010 at 3:30 pm | Posted in Aviation Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

S. Con. Res. 61: A concurrent resolution expressing the sense of the Congress that general aviation pilots and industry should be recognized for the contributions made in response to Haiti earthquake relief efforts was introduced on April 27, 2010 by Sen. Mark Begich (D-AK).

Library: A Round-up of Reading

April 27, 2010 at 2:27 pm | Posted in Library | Leave a comment

Articles
Walter Pincus, Arms treaty shouldn’t constrain U.S. missile defenses, Washington Post

G. Ryan Faith, President Obama’s Vision for Space Exploration (part 2), The Space Review

David Malfitano, Space Tourism: The Final Frontier of Law, 35 Rutgers Computer and Technology Law Journal p.203

Reports
GAO – NEXT GENERATION AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM: Challenges with Partner Agency and FAA Coordination Continue, and Efforts to Integrate Near-, Mid-, and Long-term Activities Are Ongoing

CRS – Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Reauthorization: An Overview of Legislative Action in the 111th Congress

Blogs
Gates Pushes Arms Export Fixes – DoD Buzz

Website offers new transparency on shadowy transport networks – Turtle Bay

The Fourth Amendment, New Technologies, and the Case for Caution – The Volokh Conspiracy

One List to Rule Them All, One Agency to Find Them (UPDATED) – Export Law Blog

McDonnell Backs Virginia Spaceport Today – Spaceports

Google Earth Used To Arrest Man Who Illegally Dumped Boat – Got GEOINT?

Astronomers exercise the nuclear option – Space Politics

Ryanair refuse to compensate travellers – World of Airline News

Mexico to Start Commercial Space Program – Spaceports

Mexico begins $80 million space agency center preparations – Hyperbola

Mikulski on NASA HSF Budget: “I need to know more” – Space Policy Online

Traveling With Airbags – The TSA Blog

Senate hearing notes… – RLV and Space Transport News

More thoughts about the Senate hearing… – RLV and Space Transport News

Senators want more details about NASA’s new direction – Space Politics

Air Force Launches Secretive Space Plane; ‘We Don’t Know When It’s Coming Back’ – Danger Room

Whose human flight safety standards, again? – Hyperbola

Pushing Toward a Single European Sky – Aviation Law Prof Blog

Japan Reassessing Its Human Space Flight Goals Too – Space Policy Online

FAA guidance makes it clear: There is no room for distraction in the cockpit – DOT Blog

A Look at China’s Use of Airships – Secrecy News

Targeted Killing Lite: Inside the CIA’s New Drone Arsenal – Danger Room

Harrison Schmitt details concerns about proposed Space Policy changes – Lunar Networks

UNICEF and UNOSAT strengthen their cooperation for emergency response – EARSC

National Security and the Commercial Space Sector

April 27, 2010 at 2:06 pm | Posted in Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

From CSIS:

National Security and the Commercial Space Sector
Draft Report Release

*
Date: Friday, Apr 30, 2010 | 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Location:

B1 Conference Center
Center for Strategic and International Studies
1800 K Street, NW
Washington DC, 20006
[View Map]

Draft Report Release
“National Security and the Commercial Space Sector”
Initial analysis and evaluation of options for improving commercial access to space

Friday, April 30, 2010
10:00am-11:30am

CSIS will release a draft report on the national security implications of the U.S. and global commercial space launch industry to the public for input and reaction.
10:00 am-10:10 am

Issue Overview and Introduction
Dr. John Hamre
President and CEO, CSIS

10:10am-10:50am

Report Presentation
David J. Berteau
Director, Defense Industrial Initiatives Group, CSIS
Gregory Kiley
Senior Associate, Defense Industrial Initiatives Group, CSIS

10:50am-11:30am

Open Floor for Comment / Q&A

CSIS, B1 Conference Center
1800 K Street, NW
Washington DC, 20006

To RSVP please email Lindsey Ohmit at LOhmit@csis.org or by calling (202) 775-3183.

UN Space Policy

April 27, 2010 at 1:48 pm | Posted in Space Law | 1 Comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

An interview with Ciro Arevalo Yepes, Chairman, United Nations Committee on Peaceful Use of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS) from GIS Development:

Can you elaborate on the need for a United Nations space policy?
The UN has so far pursued a highly decentralised approach to space amongst its agencies and organisations. This is not considered a tenable option for the future. This proposal for a UN space policy charts a course towards the UN regaining an important place in the global space context as the current arrangements are not fully satisfactory and a far more proactive approach is necessary to underpin and sustain the UN’s capability to play its role in the rapidly evolving space arena of the 21st century. Too much is at stake for the global community for the UN to watch from the sidelines and be only passive and reactive. To improve its ability to play a more strategic and purposeful role, UN will need to develop a balanced space policy that properly addresses the long-term requirements of the global community in its uses of outer space

There is a growing necessity for the UN to take action providing an overall stewardship to space activities for the following reasons:

Stable order in orbits: The sustainability of space activities in Earth orbits over the longterm is increasingly a matter of concern for space-faring countries and regional space organisations, as well as for emerging space actors and commercial satellite operators alike. The Earth’s orbital environment is a true common good for humankind. However, the growing population of space debris poses a major threat to the long-term sustainability of space activities. Improving the safety of space operations is thus one of the most important issues for the long-term sustainable use of orbits. Particular emphasis should be placed on the agreement reached by COPUOS on the question of the character and utilisation of the geostationary orbit and the subsequent endorsement by the UN General Assembly in resolution 55/122 of 8 December 2000 for improved management of orbital slots and electromagnetic frequencies as a measure for promoting more effective use of outer space.

Integrated approach to the use of space: The treaties governing the exploration and uses of outer space have been in place for several decades now and have served as the legal framework for space activities. However, many States have not yet acceded to the five core treaties, including some members of UNCOPUOS. Nonetheless, for preserving order in outer space, it is desirable that States and international organisations should conduct their space activities under the coverage of these instruments. Moreover, many States develop, own and operate spacecraft without participating in the rule-making process of space law, or without having ratified the existing treaties and conventions, but this needs to evolve. There are many bodies (international, regional and national) involved in rule-making on the uses of outer space. There should be, however, an integrated approach under the auspices of the UN. The UNCOPUOS will provide a forum for promoting inter-regional dialogue and coordination among these bodies. In particular, a greater involvement of the UN would facilitate the legal harmonisation of existing domestic and international legal frameworks for outer space activities.

Supportive environment for new and existing space users: In the first decades of the space age, space activities were the exclusive domain of the world powers. But there is a rapidly growing number of States involved in space activities. The changing space context, and particularly its growing complexity, is raising the importance of multilateral fora to deal with the longterm sustainability of space activities. A UN space policy would help create a supportive system and a valuable learning tool for emerging space countries.

Utilisation of space for the benefit of all humankind: Space by its nature is a useful tool for the management of issues that cross national borders. Satellite communication has become the most powerful engine of growth for development. UN-led activities like UNSPIDER and GNSS, among others, have to be promoted to deal with transnational issues such as supporting disaster relief or mitigating the effects of climate change and contributing to the development agenda.

There should be similar activities conducted under the auspices of the UN for improving human lives by sharing the benefits derived from space hardware and services. A UN space policy would help developing countries to learn and use space systems for their national welfare.

We are witnessing lot of private activity in space. How can the UN take an active role in streamlining these activities and what needs to be done?
One of the first things to do is to recognise the importance of commercialisation of the space. A transformation is seen in the last three years to this effect. We have to work with countries in order to have a greater involvement of the private sector in decision making process of the UN. At the same time, we have to remember that the UN is an organisation of member States and we have to respect that. We will evolve a mechanism where private sector’s involvement is recognised and streamlined.

Another pertinent issue is regarding the definition of outer space and the boundary between air space and outer space. Is UN space policy looking at addressing this issue?
The limitation of outer space is one of the most difficult aspects of international space law. It has not been well defined. There are a couple of approaches that have been observed in the past years though. There are various committees trying to define the limit but there has not been much success though. The current proposal is not dealing with that aspect. It is dealing with international cooperation and regional dialogue to support the establishment of national space policies.

There is a lot of talk on regional cooperation. How do we bring in all the countries together into a binding policy so that the space is not exploited for harmful purposes?
Through its work, COPOUS always targets for the preservation of major principles to keep the space for peaceful purposes for humankind. The Outer Space Treaty of 1967 is binding on all member countries with its main principles. We are working on the new countries that are arriving in the space arena. A space proposal will reach these newcomers to help them understand their own perceptions on space matters. It is a measure in long term towards sustainability in space. It is an important aspect to minimise the risk of space debris by having some modus for conduct that can set an example for new countries entering into the space arena.

Kindly elaborate on the space mitigation guidelines proposed by UN?
The space mitigation guidelines are the most important and concrete results we have achieved so far in COPOUS. The space policy will promote these guideline. One of the problems we have within the guidelines is that they are not obligatory. In my opinion we should reinforce the very essence of these guidelines by our policy by recommendations to the countries to respect these guidelines even if this is not compulsory yet. Creating a culture of respect towards space is one of the main objectives of the policy. This perception that outer space is also an integral part of earth, that it has to be seen in a holistic way to help us better understand our environment.

What kind of safety framework is UN space policy looking at?
The safety framework deals with the nuclear power sources. This is very good example of how two different entities from the UN can sit together, work together and produce a positive result while dealing with a very delicate and important problem that is power sources in outer space. So the corroboration between COPOUS and International Atomic Energy Agency is one of the finest examples on how a space policy dealing with the coordination amongst United Nations entities can produce good result. That is why we promote within the space policy initiative, not only to continue to reinforce this particular framework but to seek possibilities with other specialized agencies like ITU, INS and International Meteorological Organisation. There are so many options that can be done in the same way that the pilot program with IAEA has been done and has given good result.

Is the proposed UN space policy looking at earth observation (EO) issues as well?
Yes, the policy is looking at supporting free data access, with limitations that the market imposes. The proposal involves consensual dialogue in which private sector is also a part. But the main idea is to promote a free access especially when it is needed in worldwide problems like disaster management and climate change. We know that countries like Brazil have a successful policy of free data sharing but we would like to have that in a much wider dimension.

Is there a timeframe for this UN policy to be formalised?
Things in space go slowly but I have to say that we have been quite fast in this case, much more than any other proposal. The first step was the support the proposed policy is getting by many countries. Then we obtained the mandate from UN General Assembly, which is a success in itself.

In the meantime, I have had several informal consultations with member States who have come up with new ideas and new proposals. We are articulating them and will propose the new text in June and then it is up to the member States to decide what to do. The results will be seen in June but I am quite optimistic.

China Open To Human Spaceflight Cooperation

April 26, 2010 at 9:53 am | Posted in Space Law Current Events, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

by Joanne Irene Gabrynowicz with the blog faculty

Source: Aviation Week

By Frank Morring, Jr.

Colorado Springs

China’s human spaceflight program is developing a 13-ton cargo carrier to supply the space station it plans to orbit late this decade, but the program’s leader is ready to discuss using it for International Space Station logistics, as well.

Wang Wenbao, head of the China Manned Space Engineering Office, says his agency is prepared to cooperate across the board on human spaceflight with NASA and other agencies, including joint human missions and unpiloted logistics with the 5.5-ton-payload-capacity cargo vehicle it plans to test after 2014-16.

That would require detailed discussions on a uniform standard for docking and other interfaces, Wang said here in his first interview with Western reporters. He hopes the issue will be addressed during NASA Administrator Charles Bolden’s delayed visit to Beijing.

“We think that a joint spaceflight mission, joint development of space equipment and also joint utilization of space platforms are the most possible field to carry out discussion at the moment,” Wang says.

At one point after U.S. President Barack Obama and Chinese President Hu Jintao agreed on a Bolden visit to China, at their Beijing summit last November, the NASA administrator planned to go directly from last week’s 26th National Space Symposium here to the Chinese capital. But that was put on hold as U.S.-Chinese relations chilled over currency issues and U.S. weapons sales to Taiwan, and Bolden was authorized only to give Wang a friendly greeting at the symposium.

In an address to the symposium, Wang updated plans to launch a 30-ton space station in 2016-22. The Tiangong 1 docking target, set for launch in the first half of 2011, will be followed by Tiangong 2 and 3, versions that will carry more facilities for experiments and a regenerative life-support testbed, respectively. The cargo craft will be tested with Tiangong 3, set for launch in 2014-16, Wang says.

As previously announced, the unmanned Shenzhou 8 spacecraft will attempt an autonomous rendezvous and docking with Tiangong 1 in the second half of 2011. If that mission goes well, Shenzhou 9 and 10 will follow with human crews. If there are problems with Shenzhou 8, Shenzhou 9 also will be an unmanned mission, says Wang.

The stepwise approach follows China’s past practice of moving cautiously through more and more complex missions. The space station’s three pressurized modules will be launched on the planned Long March 5 from the new facility under development on Hainan Island, Wang says. But human crews, and the Tiangong vehicles, he says will continue to fly on the Long March 2F from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center from which the Shenzhous are orbited.

Chinese station crews will probably stay for six-month increments during the station’s 10-year planned service life. Crews will conduct spacewalks for assembly and maintenance, drawing on experience from the Shenzhou 7 mission.

Wang and his party, which includes astronaut Yang Liwei, will travel to Kennedy Space Center early this week. Last year, they hosted a delegation from the Space Foundation, which sponsors the symposium here, on a tour of space-industry facilities that included a visit to the Jiuquan launch center (AW&ST Oct. 12, 2009, p. 45).

Image: CIA Factbook

Results of the 2010 Asia Pacific Regional Round in the Manfred Lachs Space Law Moot Court Competition

April 26, 2010 at 9:44 am | Posted in Space Law Current Events | Leave a comment

by Joanne Irene Gabrynowicz with the blog faculty

Source: Dr. Ricky Lee, Secretary of the Organising Committee and Asia-Pacific Regional Organiser of the Manfred Lachs Space Law Moot Court Competition

Regional Champions: National University of Singapore

Muhammad Aidil bin Zulkifli, Dominic Wei’an Tan and Zanetta Joan Sit

Regional Runners-Up: National Law School of India University

Best Memorials: City University of Hong Kong

Best Oralist (Preliminary Rounds): Zanetta Joan Sit, National University of Singapore

Best Oralist (Final Rounds) Dominic Wei’an Tan, National University of Singapore

Final Frontier Award (for most sporting team competing in the spirit of the competition): Padjadjaran University, Indonesia

Judge Vereshchetin Award (for continuing outstanding contribution to the organisation of the AP Rounds): Professor David Flint AM

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