Library: A Round-up of Reading

August 31, 2009 at 10:32 am | Posted in Library | Leave a comment

Articles
Conrad, Daniel H. Note. Into the wild green yonder: applying the Clean Air Act to regulate emissions of greenhouse gases from aircraft. 34 N.C. J. Int’l L. & Com. Reg. 919-949 (2009).

Annals of Air and Space Law, Volume 34, 2009:

# Preface, v
# Avant-propos, vi
# In Celebration—Peter D. Nesgos, xi

# I. AIR LAW/DROIT AÉRIEN

# A. LEADING ARTICLES/ARTICLES DE FOND
# HAROLD CAPLAN, Worldwide Safety of Civil Aviation: Uniform Law to enable ICAO and Member States to narrow the gap between the best and the worst regions, on an enduring basis, 1
# JIMENA BLUMENKRON, Implications of Full Transparency in the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Universal Safety Oversight Audit Programme, 31
# KAMAAL ZAIDI, Aviation Security in Canada and US: Promoting Security and Commerce in a Multi-Layered Regime within a Federal Regulatory Framework, 71
# CHARLES E. SCHLUMBERGER, The oil price spike of 2008: The Result of Speculation or an Early Indicator of a Major and Growing Future Challenge for the Airline Industry, 111
# MARTIN BARTLIK, The Extension of EU Emission Trading Scheme to Aviation Activities, 151
# RUWANTISSA ABEYRATNE, Aircraft Registration – Legal and Regulatory Issues, 173
# MARK ANDREW GLYNN, Birds of a Feather: Network Carriers Flock Together in Early Experiences of Transatlantic Open Skies, 207
# ALAN KHEE-JIN TAN, Prospects for a Single Aviation Market in Southeast Asia, 253
# PAUL STEPHEN DEMPSEY, Accidents & Injuries in International Aviation: Confrontation of the Titans of Jurisprudence, 285
# ULRICH VON JEINSEN & ANNA KONERT, Are Non Pecuniary Damages Recoverable In Europe? – A Comparative Analysis, 311
# SEBASTIAN FERNANDEZ PEÑA, Defining Insurance Coverage Adequacy under the Montreal Convention of 1999, 343
# ALEXANDER HO, Plane Code: Does the Montreal Convention 1999 Provide an Exclusive Remedy in the International Carriage of Goods and Passengers?, 379
# NORBERTO LUONGO, The Fifth Jurisdiction – The “American Dream”, 437
# WILL S. SKINNER & STEPHEN R. GINGER, The Preemptive Effect of Federal Aviation Act, the Question of GARA and Congressional Intent to Occupy the field of Aviation Safety, 481

# B. SHORTER ARTICLES, COMMENTS AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS / DES ARTICLES PLUS COURTS ET COMMENTAIRES
# PETER P.C. HAANAPPEL, The Impact of Changing Air Transport Economics on Air Law and Policy: A Short Commentary, 519
# RUWANTISSA ABEYRATNE, The Role of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in the Twenty-First Century, 529
# YAW OTU MANKATA NYAMPONG, Editor’s Note, 545
# MICHAEL B. JENNISON, Report of the Rapporteur on the Draft Convention on Compensation for Damage Caused by Aircraft to Third Parties, in case of Unlawful Interference, 549
# ANIBAL H. MUTTI, Report of the Rapporteur on the Draft Convention on Compensation for Damage Caused by Aircraft to Third Parties (The General Risks Convention), 571

# II. SPACE LAW/DROIT SPATIAL

# A. LEADING ARTICLES/ARTICLES DE FOND
# CODY TUCKER, Lunar Rights: How Current International Law Addresses Rights to Use and Exploit Lunar Resources, the Practical Difficulties Attached, and Solutions for the Future, 591
# KATRIN NYMAN-METCALF, Space for the Benefit of Mankind? New Developments and Old Problems, 621
# GEORGE S. ROBINSON, The Search for Biogenesis and the Lurch toward Space Law Secularism, 645
# HENRY T. SCOTT, Improving the Shield: Mitigating the Danger of Space Debris by Enforcing and Developing Already Existing Space Law, 713
# C. BRANDON HALSTEAD, Hybrid Hops On (and Over) the Horizon: The Future has arrived, and requires a New Look at Air and Space Law, 775
# FRANS VON DER DUNK, Europe and the ‘Resolution Revolution’: ‘European’ Legal Approaches to Privacy and their Relevance for Space Remote Sensing Activities, 809
# ANASTASIA A. GBEM, Space Developments in African Countries: An Overview, 845

# B. SHORTER ARTICLES AND COMMENTS/DES ARTICLES PLUS COURTS ET COMMENTAIRES
# JULIAN HERMIDA, Law Reform and National Space Law: A Participatory Approach to Space Law Making in Developing Countries, 895
# RENE OOSTERLINCK, The Evolution of the Temporary Presence Exception to Patent Infringement in Relation to Space Applications and the French Space Act of 2008, 913
# Space Agency Act of 2008 – REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA, 929

# III. BOOK REVIEWS/CRITIQUES DE LIVRES
# LOTTA VIIKARI, The Environmental Element in Space Law reviewed by Yaw Otu M. Nyampong, 943

ZLW 3/2009:

Abhandlungen / Articles

Erling, Uwe M., Der EU-Emissionshandel im Luftverkehr/ Aviation and the European Emission Trading Scheme/ L’aviation dans le système européen d’échange de quotas d’émission, 337

Schiller, Gernot, Neue gemeinschaftsrechtliche Vorgaben zur Festsetzung von Flughafenentgelten: Die Richtlinie 2009/12/EG über Flughafenentgelte/ Directive 2009/12/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 March 2009 on Airport Charges/ La directive 2009/12/CE du Parlement Européen et du Conseil sur les redevances aéroportuaires, 356

Janezic, Joachim, Einfluggenehmigungen für Bedarfsluftfahrtunternehmen der Gemeinschaft im Lichte des Europarechts – erläutert an einem österreichisch / deutschem Beispiel/ The Legality of Requesting “Entry Permits” for Charter Flights in the European Union: the Example of Germany and Austria/ La légalité de la « demande de permis d’entrée » pour vols charter dans l’Union Européenne: l’exemple Allemagne-Autriche, 379

Hobe, Stephan/ Mey, Jan Helge, UN Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines /Die UN Richtlinien zur Verhütung von Weltraumtrümmern/ Lignes directrices relatives à la réduction des débris spatiaux,388

Mantl, Leopold, The Commission Proposal for a Regulation on the European Earth Observation Programme (GMES) and its Initial Operations (2011 – 2013). A major milestone for GMES/ Zum Vorschlag der Europäischen Kommission zu Regelung des GMES Programms und der ersten operationellen Schritte (2011-2013)/ Proposition de la Commission de l’UE relative au programme GMES et des premières mesures opérationnelles (2011-2013), 404

Robinson, George, Impact of the U.S. International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) on International Collaboration Involving Space Research, Exploration, and Commercialization/ Die US Amerikanischen Vorschriften über den internationalen Waffenhandel (ITAR) und die Auswirkungen auf die Weltraumwissenschaft, Forschung und Kommerzialisierung/ Les réglementations américaines sur le commerce internationale des armes – effets sur la recherche spatiale, l’exploration et la commercialisation, 423

de O. Bittencourt Neto, Olavo, Private Launch Activities on Brazilian Territory: Current Legal Framework/ Der Rechtsrahmen für Startaktivitäten Privater von brasilianischem Staatsgebiet/ Cadre juridique pour activités privés de lancement du territoire du Brésil, 429

Tagungsberichte / Reports of Conferences / Conférences et Congrès
* Fachbereich Q3 „Luft- und Weltraumrecht“ der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DGLR) und des Ausschusses „Luft und Weltraumrecht“ der Deutschen Vereinigung für Internationales Recht (DVIR), Tagung, am 27. Mai 2009 im Institut für Luft- und Weltraumrecht der Universität zu Köln von Anna Recker
* Institut für Luft- und Weltraumrecht der Universität zu Köln, Fachgespräch Luftrecht, 27. Mai 2009: Finanzierung von Flughäfen. Überarbeitung der Gemeinschaftlichen Leitlinien von 2005 von Angela Seidenspinner
* Luftsicherheit 2008. Bericht über den dritten Fachkongress Luftsicherheit am 23. und 24. Oktober 2008 in Berlin, von Bastian R. Rothe und Harald Zielinski
* International Interdisciplinary Congress on Space Debris, organized by the McGill University Institute of Air and Space Law, Montreal (Canada) in cooperation with the Institute of Air and Space Law at Cologne University (Germany) and the International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (The Netherlands), Montreal, 7-9 May 2009, von Axelle Cartier
* Workshop on Policy Aspects of Third Party Liability in Satellite Navigation. Preparing a Roadmap for Europe, European Space Policy Institute (ESPI), Vienna, Austria,15 May 2009, von Matxalen Sánchez Aranzamendi, 450

Gesetzgebung / Legislation / Législation

Multilaterlale Übereinkommen, 478
* Bekanntmachung zu dem Europäischen Übereinkommen über das grenzüberschreitende Fernsehen. Vom 29. Januar 2009 (BGBl. II 2009, 211)
* Bekanntmachung über den Geltungsbereich des Zusatzprotokolls gegen die Schleusung von Migranten auf dem Land-, See- und Luftweg zum Übereinkommen der Vereinten Nationen gegen die grenzüberschreitende organisierte Kriminalität. Vom 12. März 2009 (BGBl. II, 2009, 340)
* Bekanntmachung über den Geltungsbereich des Wiener Übereinkommens zum Schutz der Ozonschicht sowie über den Geltungsbereich des Montrealer Protokolls über Stoffe, die zu einem Abbau der Ozonschicht führen, und der Änderungen von 1990, 1992, 1997 und 1999 hierzu. Vom 26. Januar 2009 (BGBl. II, 2009, 430)

Nationale Gesetzgebung, 482
* Gesetz zur Fortentwicklung des Pfandbriefrechts. Vom 20. März 2009 (BGBl. I, 2009, 607)
* Erste Verordnung zur Änderung der Verordnung über Flugfunkzeugnisse. Vom 31. März 2009 (BGBl. I 2009, 746)
* Gesetz zur Änderung vom 23. März 2007 des Übereinkommens vom 20. August 1971 über die Internationale Fernmeldesatellitenorganisation „ITSO“. Vom 6. April 2009 (BGBl. II, 2009, 318)
* Verordnung über die Ermittlung der Beleihungswerte von Flugzeugen nach § 26d Absatz 1 und 2 des Pfandbriefgesetzes (Flugzeugbeleihungswertermittlungsverordnung – FlugBelWertV). Vom 20. April 2009 (BGBl. I, 2009, 1036)

Schrifttum / Book Reviews / Bibliographie, 529
* Nath, Ravi / Crans, Berend, Aircraft Repossession and Enforcement: Practical Aspects, Kluwer Law International (The Netherlands) 2009, 1192 pp., ISBN 978-90-411-2648-1 (Opitz)
* Jochen Wehrle, Der Streit um die Nordanflüge – völkerrechtliche Probleme des Anflugs auf grenznahe Flughäfen, Dargestellt am Beispiel des Flughafens Zürich. Schriften zum Planungs-, Verkehrs- und Technikrecht, Band 26. Hamburg 2008. 322 S., ISBN 978-3-8300-3351-6 (Schladebach)
* Kim, Doo Hwan, Essays for the Study of the International Air and Space Law, Korea Studies Information Co. Ltd, 2008, 730 pp plus 1 annex 55pp., ISBN 978-89-534-7661-5 (Leloudas)
* Hobe, Stephan / Heinrich, Oliver / Kerner, Irina / Froehlich, Annette, Entwicklung der Europäischen Weltraumagentur als „implementing agency“ der Europäischen Union: Rechtsrahmen und Anpassungserfordernisse, in: Hobe (Hrsg.) Kölner Schriften zum internationalen und europäischen Recht, Lit-Verlag, Berlin 2009, 504 p., ISBN 978-3-643- 10047-4 (Mey)
* Hofmann-Wellenhof / Bernhard/Lichtenegger, Herbert / Wasle, Elmar, GNSS – Global Navigation Satellite Systems, GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and more, Wien: Springer, 2008, 516 pp., ISBN: 978-3-211-73012-6 (Schrogl)
* Naudin, Christophe, Sûreté aérienne: La grande illusion. Éditions de La Table Ronde, Paris 2007. 269 S., ISBN 978-2-7103-2938-1 (Chané)

Veröffentlichungen auf dem Gebiet des Luft- und Weltraumrechts / Recent Publications / Nouvelles Publications, 540

Reports
AIAA – Inside Aerospace 2009: Building and Retaining the Aerospace Workforce (executive summary)

ESPI – Perspectives 26: Efforts, Motivation and Benefits of Spaceflight – A Brief Guide for Space Advocates and Decision-Makers

Journals
High Frontier Journal

SatMagazine (Sept. 2009)

Blogs
NASA Budget Outlook Still Uncertain – Space policy Online

‘Makers of Military Drones Take Off’ – Opinio Juris

Joint American-Russian Manned Mars Mission? – Spaceports

START Follow On Sessions – Arms Control Wonk

Kennedy and Airline Deregulation – Aviation Law Prof Blog

More on Kennedy and Airline Deregulation – Aviation Law Prof Blog

The Sky’s the Limit – Dipnote

The Congolese Space Program – FP Passport

“Privatization of Space Exploration”: A Book Review – Commercial Space Gateway

ASAT Test Bans – Arms Control Wonk

PanAm 103 Bombing Case Still Open – Georgetown Security Law Brief

Spatial Law and Policy Update (August 30, 2009) – Spatial Law and Policy

Poll: Many Want Space Cooperation with The People’s Republic of China – Spaceports

CD Fails to Gain Consensus

August 31, 2009 at 10:27 am | Posted in Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

The Conference on Disarmament, after adopting a program of work earlier this year, failed to gain consensus on procedural matters implementing that program of work. According to Reuters:

Arms negotiators failed to clear the way on Monday for the start of talks this year on nuclear disarmament as Pakistan said its security interests had not been respected. . . .

. . . “The window of opportunity for this year is closing today,” Austrian Ambassador Christian Strohal, the current president of the conference, told the 65-member forum.

“It is with serious regret that I have to inform the conference that consensus …. still eludes us.” . . .

More from Arms Control Wonk.

Open forum on the draft Space Protocol to the Cape Town Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment

August 31, 2009 at 10:07 am | Posted in Space Law Current Events | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

From the BNSC:

Open forum on the draft Space Protocol to the Cape Town Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment

To be held on Thursday 17 September 2009
at The Department for Business Innovation and Skills,
1 Victoria Street,
London SW1H 0ET
starting at 9.30am BST

BNSC invites those interested in satellite finance, whether as manufacturers, operators, users, lawyers or financial institutions, are cordially invited to participate in an ‘Open Forum’ to be held on Thursday 17th September 2009 at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) at 1 Victoria Street, London, starting at 9.30am.

The Forum will be an examination of the Unidroit draft Space Protocol to the Cape Town Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment. The draft will be examined at the third session of the Unidroit committee of governmental experts, and it is envisaged that, subject to the approval of the Unidroit Governing Council, a fourth session in the first half of 2010 will be followed by a Diplomatic Conference to adopt the Protocol.

After introductory remarks by Professor Richard Crowther from BNSC’s partner, The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Professor Sir Roy Goode, who represents the UK as Co-Chairman of the Drafting Committee, will lead a discussion on key aspects of the draft Protocol. Those attending are encouraged to contribute their own expertise to the discussion and to put forward any ideas they may have for elaboration or improvement of the text.

Participants will be sent a copy of the Convention and a draft of the Protocol together with an explanatory memorandum.

A number of experts involved in the space industry have indicated their intention to take part in this participatory seminar. Those who have not yet registered but wish to attend should complete the online form below as soon as possible (please note that we have limited capacity and that requests to attend will be treated on a first come, first serve basis).

Proceedings of 51st Colloquium on the Law of Outer Space

August 31, 2009 at 10:02 am | Posted in Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

The IISL has made the table of contents from the Proceedings of 51st Colloquium on the Law of Outer Space available. Ordering information should follow soon.

NOAA, Japan Establish Navigation Satellite Ground Station in Guam

August 28, 2009 at 8:36 am | Posted in Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

From NOAA:

NOAA, Japan Establish Navigation Satellite Ground Station in Guam

August 27, 2009

Members of the U.S.-Japan GPS-QZSS Experts Working Group at the NOAA Weather Forecast Office in Guam.

Members of the U.S.-Japan GPS-QZSS Experts Working Group at the NOAA Weather Forecast Office in Guam. Back row, left to right: Ray Cancel, Hiroaki Maeda, Satoshi Kogure, Koji Terada, Alice Wong, Genevieve Miller, John Betz, A.J. Van Dierendonck, Patrick Harrington, Anil Hariharan. Front row, left to right: Hiroshi Soga, Takahiro Mitome, Tamaki Takahashi.

The Quasi-Zenith Satellite System, designed to work seamlessly with the U.S. Global Positioning System, is a JAXA effort to improve navigation satellite coverage over Japan and surrounding areas. The first QZSS satellite is expected to launch in 2010.

Speaking at a ceremony on August, 25 at NOAA’s National Weather Forecast Office in Guam, Genevieve Miller, meteorologist in charge said the new station strengthens the collaboration between the United States and Japan in the area of GPS and satellite navigation.

NOAA and JAXA have worked since 2008 to install the monitoring station at the NOAA Weather Forecast Office in Guam. The station is the result of a joint agreement between the two agencies, which allows JAXA to place antennas and other equipment on the NOAA property to observe the QZSS satellites. In return, JAXA will share satellite data from the station with NOAA, which integrates information from hundreds of GPS tracking stations into the National Spatial Reference System. . . . [Full Story]

Google Street View Complaints

August 27, 2009 at 2:51 pm | Posted in Aerospace Law Interfaces | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

From GeoConnexion:

France and Switzerland contest Google Street View

26 August 2009, 10:07am

After being criticised and contested in several countries in Europe, such as UK, Germany and Greece and even outside Europe like in Japan, it is the turn of France and Switzerland to complain against Google’s service Street View.

Several complaints have been recorded in France in 2009 against Street View service as recently indicated by the French Data Protection Authority – CNIL (Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertés).

CNIL is keeping an eye of Google’s system as the company has introduced in France this summer tricycles equipped with cameras to explore parks, walking streets and other less crowded areas. Despite the system introduced by Google to blur faces and other identification elements such as licence plates from the images taken by Street View cameras, the system is not 100% proof. For instance, profiles or faces through grills can still be visible and are not blurred. Besides, people are also asking for other elements to be blurred such as the access to private homes.

The French authority is also concerned about the delay in the data treatment and the retention of raw images. In June, Google committed in front of European Commission’s Article 29 working party to improve this aspect and delete the raw images but not on a very short term and no precise period of time was given.

In Switzerland, less than one week after the launching of Street View, the authorities have already asked for the immediate interruption of the service under threat of taking the case to court as they consider that Google’s blurring technology is not good enough. . . . [Full Story]

Report: U.S. to Scrap E. Europe Missile Shield Bases

August 27, 2009 at 1:50 pm | Posted in Space Law Current Events | Leave a comment

by Joanne Irene Gabrynowicz with the blog faculty

 

Source: Defense News

 

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Published: 27 Aug 2009 05:25

 

WARSAW, Poland – Washington will scrap plans to put anti-missile bases in Poland and the Czech Republic and is looking at alternatives including Israel and Turkey, a Polish newspaper reported Aug. 27, citing U.S. officials.

 

The U.S. plan, intended for defense against attacks from Iran, has met with fierce objections from Russia, which regarded the eastern European bases as a threat to its own security.

 

Leading Polish daily Gazeta Wyborcza cited administration officials and lobbyists in Washington in support of its story.

 

Pro-missile shield lobbyist Riki Ellison said the signals from the Pentagon were “absolutely clear,” with U.S. authorities scouting for alternatives sites, the paper reported.

 

No immediate comment was available from U.S., Polish or Czech officials.

 

Gazeta Wyborcza said Washington was now considering deploying anti-missile interceptors on naval vessels and at bases in Israel and Turkey, as well as potentially in the Balkans.

 

Ellison told the paper that a conference last week, U.S. generals “never once” mentioned the plan, which was initiated by the previous U.S. administration of President George W. Bush.

 

After taking office this year, Bush’s successor, Barack Obama, launched a review of the controversial system.

 

Gazeta Wyborcza cited a source at the U.S. Congress, whom it did not identify, as saying that Washington had been “testing the water” among lawmakers for weeks about scrapping the eastern European part of the plan.

 

In 2008, Warsaw and Washington struck a deal on deploying 10 U.S. long-range interceptor missiles in Poland as part of a global air-defense system.

 

The system, which was meant to be operational by 2013, also foresaw a radar base in the Czech Republic, Poland’s southern neighbor.

 

Washington said the goal was to ward off potential Iranian attacks, pointing to Tehran’s nuclear program.

 

But Moscow condemned what it said was a U.S. threat on its doorstep and threatened to train nuclear warheads on Poland and the Czech Republic.

 

Warsaw and Prague broke from the crumbling communist bloc in 1989 and joined NATO 10 years later.

Transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities

August 26, 2009 at 7:45 am | Posted in Library, Space Law | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

A new United Nations report titled Transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities (A/64/138) has become available. The contents include:

I. Introduction . . . . . 2
II. Replies received from Governments . . . . . 2
Argentina . . . . . 2
Colombia . . . . . 3
Cuba . . . . . 4
Czech Republic (on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the European Union) . . . . . 6
Lebanon . . . . . 9
Mexico . . . . . 9
Nicaragua . . . . . 10
Qatar . . . . . 11
Syrian Arab Republic . . . . . 11
Ukraine. . . . . 12

Conference on International Aviation Liability & Insurance

August 25, 2009 at 11:02 am | Posted in Aviation Law Current Event | Leave a comment

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

The Institute of Air and Space Law at McGill University will be hosting a Conference on International Aviation Liability & Insurance on October 30-31, 2009 in Montreal, Canada. Registration is open.

South Korea Launches Satellite

August 25, 2009 at 9:00 am | Posted in Space Law Current Events | Leave a comment

by Joanne Irene Gabrynowicz with the blog faculty

Source: NY Times  

 

By CHOE SANG-HUN
Published: August 25, 2009
SEOUL — <http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/international/countriesandterritories/southkorea/index.html?inline=nyt-geo>South Korea launched a rocket into space from its own territory for the first time on Tuesday, putting a satellite into orbit one week after an initial attempt was scrubbed at the last minute because of a technical malfunction.
Yonhap, via European Pressphoto Agency
The Korea Space Launch Vehicle-1 blasted off into space on Tuesday.
The nationally televised event came four months after North Korea was widely denounced by the international community after launching a rocket of its own. United States aerospace and military officials said they believed the North was actually testing long-range ballistic missile technology under the guise of launching a satellite.
Office buildings in central Seoul echoed with cheers as Space Launch Vehicle-1, or Naro-1, blasted off from South Korea’s space center on the central south coast.
But the rocket failed to put the satellite into its intended orbit, Ahn Myong-man, the minister of education, science and technology, told reporters.
Mr. Ahn gave no further details. But South Korean media, citing unidentified sources, said the satellite broke away from the rocket 36 kilometers further away from the Earth than had been intended.
North Korea has said it will “closely watch” whether the United States and its allies criticize the South’s rocket launching. The North insists that its rocket launching in April was part of a peaceful space program, and accused the <http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/u/united_nations/index.html?inline=nyt-org>United Nations of “hypocrisy” when it imposed sanctions.
With all its neighbors — China, Japan and North Korea — pursuing space programs, South Korea has been eager to have its own. But when the United States refused to help, for fear of fueling a potential arms race in the region, South Korea turned to Russia. South Korea says that unlike North Korea, it has been pursuing its space program transparently, within the boundaries of its international commitments, not to develop and proliferate long-range missile technology.
The Naro-1 rocket was built jointly with Russia’s Khrunichev space production center at a cost of $400 million. After the rocket launching was delayed several times because of technical glitches, a debate flared in the South Korean news media over the wisdom of spending so much to develop a home-grown launching system. Until now, all South Korean satellites have been launched aboard foreign rockets from overseas sites.
There was no immediate reaction from North Korea on Tuesday.
“North Korea will surely try to use the South Korean launch to justify its own. But in the end, its attempt will be dismissed as propaganda because there are clear differences between the two,” said Jeung Young-tae, an analyst at the government-funded Korea Institute for National Unification.
Although the rocket technology can be converted into missiles, legal constraints and pressure from the United States will keep South Korea from adapting its space program for military use, he said.
The South Korean rocket was carrying a domestically built satellite designed to monitor the atmosphere and the ocean.

The launching came on the same day that South Korea and North Korea agreed to hold talks this week about arranging reunions of families separated by the Korean War more than 55 years ago. The discussions between Red Cross officials from both countries would be their first joint meeting in two years.

By CHOE SANG-HUN

By CHOE SANG-HUN

Published: August 25, 2009

SEOUL — South Korea launched a rocket into space from its own territory for the first time on Tuesday, putting a satellite into orbit one week after an initial attempt was scrubbed at the last minute because of a technical malfunction.

Yonhap, via European Pressphoto Agency

The Korea Space Launch Vehicle-1 blasted off into space on Tuesday.

The nationally televised event came four months after North Korea was widely denounced by the international community after launching a rocket of its own. United States aerospace and military officials said they believed the North was actually testing long-range ballistic missile technology under the guise of launching a satellite.

Office buildings in central Seoul echoed with cheers as Space Launch Vehicle-1, or Naro-1, blasted off from South Korea’s space center on the central south coast.

But the rocket failed to put the satellite into its intended orbit, Ahn Myong-man, the minister of education, science and technology, told reporters.

Mr. Ahn gave no further details. But South Korean media, citing unidentified sources, said the satellite broke away from the rocket 36 kilometers further away from the Earth than had been intended.

North Korea has said it will “closely watch” whether the United States and its allies criticize the South’s rocket launching. The North insists that its rocket launching in April was part of a peaceful space program, and accused the United Nations of “hypocrisy” when it imposed sanctions.

With all its neighbors — China, Japan and North Korea — pursuing space programs, South Korea has been eager to have its own. But when the United States refused to help, for fear of fueling a potential arms race in the region, South Korea turned to Russia. South Korea says that unlike North Korea, it has been pursuing its space program transparently, within the boundaries of its international commitments, not to develop and proliferate long-range missile technology.

The Naro-1 rocket was built jointly with Russia’s Khrunichev space production center at a cost of $400 million. After the rocket launching was delayed several times because of technical glitches, a debate flared in the South Korean news media over the wisdom of spending so much to develop a home-grown launching system. Until now, all South Korean satellites have been launched aboard foreign rockets from overseas sites.

There was no immediate reaction from North Korea on Tuesday.

“North Korea will surely try to use the South Korean launch to justify its own. But in the end, its attempt will be dismissed as propaganda because there are clear differences between the two,” said Jeung Young-tae, an analyst at the government-funded Korea Institute for National Unification.

Although the rocket technology can be converted into missiles, legal constraints and pressure from the United States will keep South Korea from adapting its space program for military use, he said.

The South Korean rocket was carrying a domestically built satellite designed to monitor the atmosphere and the ocean.

The launching came on the same day that South Korea and North Korea agreed to hold talks this week about arranging reunions of families separated by the Korean War more than 55 years ago. The discussions between Red Cross officials from both countries would be their first joint meeting in two years.

 

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